Read On the Border with CROOK (1891) (English Edition) by John Gregory Bourke Online

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John Gregory Bourke 1846 1896 was a captain in the United States Army and a prolific diarist and postbellum author he wrote several books about the American Old West, including ethnologies of its indigenous peoples He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions while a cavalryman in the Union Army during the American Civil War Based on his service during the war, his commander nominated him to West Point, where he graduated in 1869, leading to service as an Army officer until 1886.He served as an aide to General George Crook in the Apache Wars from 1872 to 1883 As Crook s aide, Bourke had the opportunity to witness every facet of life in the Old Westthe battles, wildlife, the internal squabbling among the military, the Indian Agency, settlers, and Native Americans.The author is well known in literary and scientific circles by his work, The Snake Dance of the Moquis, and other ethnological researches The present volume tells the story, in a fascinating way, of many years of frontier service with General Crooka story that is far less known in the country than it deserves to be Endowed with brilliant talents and devoted to his chief, he saw the salient points of every movement in a then extremely hostile country, and jotted down in his note books, from which this book is written, all the grave, and various incidents which distinguished General Crook s campaigns against the Apaches, and afterward against the hostile Sioux of the North.He kept voluminous notes during all these years, and from them has written a book of surpassing interest The events of campaign after campaign are related in witty narrative form, embracing not only pleasant and often ludicrous incidents, but also hardships cold, hunger and dangersborne by the troops in these little appreciated Western services.Few, except those who followed General Crook in these campaigns, can form any idea of their hardships, and fewer still realize the unwearying devotion displayed by him under the most trying circumstances or his entire disregard of his own personal comfort and the persistence and courage with which he followed out his plans He cared nothing for personal distinctions, and always seemed the embodiment of duty He was called a great Indian fighter, but he was the last one to provoke an Indian outbreak and was only satisfied to fight when all means of preserving peace had failed He had a wonderful faculty for gaining and keeping the confidence of the Indians, and seemed to understand their nature thoroughly For nearly twenty years, in all his hardest Indian campaigns, from Mexico to the Yellowstone, from lands of sun to lands of snow Captain Bourke was the general s intimate and trusted friend, and this book, while not a biography, is full of intensely interesting details of one of the most picturesque and heroic of lives The conditions of Indian warfare, which he had to meet, are not likely to occur again The vast regions of former hostile occupancy have dwindled into small reservations, and railroads and civilization have marked the Indian for absorption into the body politic But this story of the services of General Crook and those who served with him in his campaigns is not likely to be forgotten.This book is written in a happy vein and the narration of events recorded, while adhering to strict accuracy, is full of vivacity and polish of diction There is not a dull page in it Frontier life, in its most picturesque phases, with packers, teamsters, scouts, guides, Indians, and all the incidents of campaigning in a wild and hostile country appear in realistic color.Outside the main story of General Crook s services, the book will have a permanent interest for its fascinating descriptions of characters and conditions which we shall probably see no .Kindle reformat of 1891 publication original spellings kept in place may have occasional imperfection....

Title : On the Border with CROOK (1891) (English Edition)
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ISBN : B01BNA6RIE
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Format Type : Kindle Edition
Language : Englisch
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Number of Pages : 370 Pages
File Size : 695 KB
Status : Available For Download
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On the Border with CROOK (1891) (English Edition) Reviews

  • None
    2018-10-23 21:41

    John Bourke writes wonderfully of General George Crook, a legendary Indian fighter in post-Civil War Arizona, Wyoming, and Montanna. Bourke, who for most of the time was Crook's aide-de-camp, is an unabashed admirer of the General, but the book goes far beyond flattery and sycophancy. Bourke makes the reader admire Crook as much as he himself does, for Crook truly did possess unmatched stamina, experience, attention to detail and equal measures of sympathy for the Indians he was fighting and ruthlessness in his ambition to drive them onto the reservations. Bourke too admires the Indians, especially the Apaches. In fact, one of the book's high points is its almost anthropological descriptions of Apache life, the Arizona landscape, life in the frontier Army, and the social milieu of old Tuscon. The descriptions of Crook's campaigns against the Sioux and Cheyenne flag just a little, but only in comparison to Bourke's own rapturous discussions of life in the Southwest. The book that this compares best to is Eugene Ware's "The Indian War of 1864" (which I've also reviewed for Amazon). Ware, like Bourke, was a serving Army officer with a keen, sympathetic eye for all he saw in the old West. Both were involved in more hair-raising episodes than a dozen Hollywood action heroes combined. I too am a serving Army officer, and I can testify that none of my peers today has seen as much or writes so well.

  • None
    2018-11-14 17:46

    John Bourke writes wonderfully of General George Crook, a legendary Indian fighter in post-Civil War Arizona, Wyoming, and Montanna. Bourke, who for most of the time was Crook's aide-de-camp, is an unabashed admirer of the General, but the book goes far beyond flattery and sycophancy. Bourke makes the reader admire Crook as much as he himself does, for Crook truly did possess unmatched stamina, experience, attention to detail and equal measures of sympathy for the Indians he was fighting and ruthlessness in his ambition to drive them onto the reservations. Bourke too admires the Indians, especially the Apaches. In fact, one of the book's high points is its almost anthropological descriptions of Apache life, the Arizona landscape, life in the frontier Army, and the social milieu of old Tuscon. The descriptions of Crook's campaigns against the Sioux and Cheyenne flag just a little, but only in comparison to Bourke's own rapturous discussions of life in the Southwest. The book that this compares best to is Eugene Ware's "The Indian War of 1864" (which I've also reviewed for Amazon). Ware, like Bourke, was a serving Army officer with a keen, sympathetic eye for all he saw in the old West. Both were involved in more hair-raising episodes than a dozen Hollywood action heroes combined. I too am a serving Army officer, and I can testify that none of my peers today has seen as much or writes so well.

  • Kenneth G. Ramey
    2018-10-21 18:46

    The concept of Manifest Destiny took root during the Mexican American War, and assumed grander proportions following the Civil War. Gen. Crook had been a calvery officer whose services proved to be of considerable value, as much for his ability as for his compassion for the Indians. His job was to protect the settlers and subdue the Indians by locating them on reservations. The author was with Crook during his first and second Southwest campaigns as well as that of the Northern Plains. His love for his commander and appreciation of the Indians made him the perfect writer for the topic. Gen. Crook seems the ideal officer for the job, but was defeated, not by the Indians but Agents assigned, after the army had done its work, to reservations by Washington. The book is a wonderful description of the duty performed by Gen. Crook who, had his system been utilized, would have led to a better life for all. In the end, Bourke feels, Crook died of a broken heart. Important history, and a story too beautifully told to miss.

  • BMac
    2018-11-06 20:44

    I am a history buff and I am thoroughly pleased with this book. John Bourke is an excellent writer with a keen eye for detail and a very keen, observing eye when it comes to the US and its dealings with the American Indian tribes, specifically the Apaches in Arizona. I am halfway through this book and I have had multiple ah-hah moments as the author makes a statement like "nothing has been so neglected by the Americans as an examination into the mental processes by which an Indian arrives at his conclusions; the omens auguries, hopes and fears by which he is controlled". Written by a man who fought the Apaches yet who admired them as a race, as a people, as a community. His respect for the tribes that he had exposure to shines through along with his ability to convey life on the frontier in the late 1860's early 1870's. If are interested in this time period and genre I highly recommend. My other favorite in this time period is "Son of the Morning Star - Custer and the Little Big Horn". I have probably read it 5 or 6 times over the past 25 years and I also highly recommend it.

  • MrGman
    2018-11-07 18:36

    As an Arizonian (now) and history buff I really loved this book, however, I must admit that I had to constantly be checking the vocabulary words used as many that I have never seen before. Undoubtedly this is because the book was written in the 19th century and the language was a little different and archaic but still for the most part very readable. I loved his descriptions of early (mid-late 19th century) Arizona, the flora and fauna of the times and the military's interface, both good and bad, with the Native Americans many Apache tribes and sub tribes. General Crook seemed like the All American Military Officer regardless of the trouble he got into with the government at the time. He seemed like a very honest and caring man with a very difficult mission. For anyone interested it raw information about the early west and especially the Arizona Territory before statehood this would be required reading. In addition to the description of the Native American's and military there are some great colorful early American's discussed that seem to come right our of central casting for a movie. Really interesting. This is not like any history book you will see in school though if there is such a thing anymore based on some of the knowledge of our youth but the writings of one of Gen Crooks subordinates who served under him during that period. As a side note I always have been interested in Native American culture and it is quite interesting to read other things such as books on the Lewis and Clark Expedition also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition which goes into great detail about a multitude of Native American Tribes they encountered during their journey. Their journey though dealt mainly with Plains, Northern and North Western tribes and their life style while the Bourke book for the most part dealt mainly with the South Western tribes. In any case really interesting reading.

  • Fantasyman
    2018-11-15 15:53

    Extremely well written memoirs of service with General Crook during the Indian wars of the West. Lots of details on life on the campaign trail, in camp, and, the general situation in Arizona in the 1870's and 1880's. Definitely a life in the saddle view of events. There is a lot of background on the Apaches and other Indians on the frontier, as well as the prospectors and cattlemen, and Mexicans that peopled Arizona at the time. The writer was keenly interested in social and economic issues of the day on the frontier, lots of information and insight into the politics and personalities of the day. Provides the reader with in-depth perspective on life in the Army on the frontier, as well as life in general for those that lived on the frontier. The hardships and dangers of life in Arizona and the Old West are presented with remarkable detail, along with commentary on social and political issues that surrounded events. Should be considered a primary source for a lot of background on frontier life in general.

  • E. Joseph Anna
    2018-11-11 18:52

    "On the Border with Crook" by John G. Bourke is one of those unique first person accounts of historical events that we think we know about, but not really. As a Captain in the Army in the 1870s and 1880 Bourke was with General George Crook during a period known as the "Indian Wars". Starting with the hostile Apaches in Arizona, and then with the hostile Sioux and Cheyenne in Wyoming and Montana, Crook first subdued the war-like elements and dealt honestly and humanely with the ones who cease to be hostile. Crook's policies towards the Indians were not popular with the politicians in Washington, but even today would be considered enlightened. Bourke describes in detail the white residents, the various Indian tribes, and the flora and fauna of the West, not yet part of the United States. Having grown up in Wyoming myself and spending a number of years in Arizona I can attest to accuracy of the material he describes. The only faults of the book (written about 1895) is the use of numerous archaic adjectives, and the individual naming of numerous Army officers and Indians involved. This is a must read for anyone interested in western frontier life.

  • Ray P. Raudebaugh
    2018-11-01 17:27

    I found this book to be surprising well written and very informative. It is a first hand look at the Anglo vs American Indian conflicts during the second half of the 19th century written by a man who was there. It gives insight as to the character of one of the main figures of these conflicts and I can only say that it is too bad that there were not more like General Crook. Had there been there would have undoubtedly been fewer conflicts. He was truly an amazing man.I also found this book intensely interesting from a stand point of the history of Arizona during the Apache wars of the 1860's and 1870's. Of course a great deal of my interest stems from the fact that I come from an Arizona pioneer family with my first ancestors arriving in the early 1870's when much of this action occurred. Regardless of that fact I think that this book is a must read for anyone interested in this period of our history. Even though I am fairly knowledgeable about the history of Arizona this book taught me much that was new to me.